WOLFSTONGUE

A lyrical fable about the power of language and the relationship between humans and the natural world.

‘An unforgettable fable. Raw, devastating and brilliantly written.’ – Lucy Strange, author of The Ghost of Gosswater

‘A fiercely gentle tale, heartwarming and brave.’ – Myra Zepf, Winner KPMG/CBI Children’s Book of the Year 2020

‘A startling entrance into children’s fiction.’ – Pet O’Connell, The Echo

‘An edge-of-the-seat adventure.’ – Meg Rosoff, author of The Great Godden

‘An intelligent and powerful story about words and language and what it means to have a voice. The illustrations by Anna Tromop are stunning too!’
– A. M. Howell, author of The House of One Hundred Clocks

‘An absolute delight. Warm and thoughtful, full of insight.’ – Kelly McCaughrain, author of Flying Tips for Flightless Birds

Wolfstongue has classic written all over it’ – Patricia Forde, author of The Wordsmith

Wolfstongue

I started writing Wolfstongue for my son, who has speech difficulties and has always loved wolves… I hope the book takes readers on an adventure while also offering them a myth that they may find useful: a myth about how language can trap us or make us free, about the self-doubt we feel when we can’t find the words we need, and about how human stories have power to shape the natural world.”

Honest Ulsterman

‘… a conversation emerged that returned on several occasions to the themes of communication and representation, their inevitable failures and the persistent, urgent necessity to pursue some form of apotheosis through language. We talked. We waited. No conclusions.’

David Haughey asked me a lot of in-depth, insightful questions in this interview in the latest edition of The Honest Ulsterman.